The two societies in pride and prejudice by jane austen

Her Life and Letters, published in She was born a month later than her parents expected; her father wrote of her arrival in a letter that her mother "certainly expected to have been brought to bed a month ago". He added that her arrival was particularly welcome as "a future companion to her sister".

The two societies in pride and prejudice by jane austen

If Elizabeth, when Mr. Darcy gave her the letter, did not expect it to contain a renewal of his offers, she had formed no expectation at all of its contents. But such as they were, it may be well supposed how eagerly she went through them, and what a contrariety of emotion they excited.

Her feelings as she read were scarcely to be defined. With amazement did she first understand that he believed any apology to be in his power; and steadfastly was she persuaded that he could have no explanation to give, which a just sense of shame would not conceal.

With a strong prejudice against every thing he might say, she began his account of what had happened at Netherfield. She read, with an eagerness which hardly left her power of comprehension, and from impatience of knowing what the next sentence might bring, was incapable of attending to the sense of the one before her eyes.

He expressed no regret for what he had done which satisfied her; his style was not penitent, but haughty. It was all pride and insolence. But when this subject was succeeded by his account of Mr. Wickham, when she read with somewhat clearer attention, a relation of events, which, if true, must overthrow every cherished opinion of his worth, and which bore so alarming an affinity to his own history of himself, her feelings were yet more acutely painful and more difficult of definition.

Astonishment, apprehension, and even horror, oppressed her. This must be the grossest falsehood! In this perturbed state of mind, with thoughts that could rest on nothing, she walked on; but it would not do; in half a minute the letter was unfolded again, and collecting herself as well as she could, she again began the mortifying perusal of all that related to Wickham, and commanded herself so far as to examine the meaning of every sentence.

The account of his connection with the Pemberley family, was exactly what he had related himself; and the kindness of the late Mr. Darcy, though she had not before known its extent, agreed equally well with his own words. So far each recital confirmed the other: What Wickham had said of the living was fresh in her memory, and as she recalled his very words, it was impossible not to feel that there was gross duplicity on one side or the other; and, for a few moments, she flattered herself that her wishes did not err.

She put down the letter, weighed every circumstance with what she meant to be impartiality—deliberated on the probability of each statement—but with little success. On both sides it was only assertion. Again she read on. But every line proved more clearly that the affair, which she had believed it impossible that any contrivance could so represent, as to render Mr.

The extravagance and general profligacy which he scrupled not to lay to Mr. She had never heard of him before his entrance into the ——shire Militia, in which he had engaged at the persuasion of the young man, who, on meeting him accidentally in town, had there renewed a slight acquaintance.

Humour and Irony in Jane Austen’s ‘Pride and Prejudice’ – Of Scripted Shadows and Painted Words

Of his former way of life, nothing had been known in Hertfordshire but what he told himself. As to his real character, had information been in her power, she had never felt a wish of enquiring. His countenance, voice, and manner, had established him at once in the possession of every virtue.

She tried to recollect some instance of goodness, some distinguished trait of integrity or benevolence, that might rescue him from the attacks of Mr.

Darcy; or at least, by the predominance of virtue, atone for those casual errors, under which she would endeavour to class, what Mr. Darcy had described as the idleness and vice of many years continuance.

But no such recollection befriended her. She could see him instantly before her, in every charm of air and address; but she could remember no more substantial good than the general approbation of the neighbourhood, and the regard which his social powers had gained him in the mess.

The two societies in pride and prejudice by jane austen

After pausing on this point a considerable while, she once more continued to read. At one time she had almost resolved on applying to him, but the idea was checked by the awkwardness of the application, and at length wholly banished by the conviction that Mr.

She perfectly remembered every thing that had passed in conversation between Wickham and herself, in their first evening at Mr. Many of his expressions were still fresh in her memory.

She was now struck with the impropriety of such communications to a stranger, and wondered it had escaped her before. She saw the indelicacy of putting himself forward as he had done, and the inconsistency of his professions with his conduct.

She remembered that he had boasted of having no fear of seeing Mr. Darcy might leave the country, but that he should stand his ground; yet he had avoided the Netherfield ball the very next week.

She remembered also, that till the Netherfield family had quitted the country, he had told his story to no one but herself; but that after their removal, it had been every where discussed; that he had then no reserves, no scruples in sinking Mr.

How differently did every thing now appear in which he was concerned! His attentions to Miss King were now the consequence of views solely and hatefully mercenary; and the mediocrity of her fortune proved no longer the moderation of his wishes, but his eagerness to grasp at any thing.Read the full text of Chapter 1 of Pride and Prejudice on Shmoop.

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Home / Literature / Lizzy is not a bit better than the others; and I am sure she is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good-humoured as Lydia. ‘Pride and Prejudice’: Austen began writing this novel under the title ‘First Impressions’.

This narrates the story of the Bennet family and their five unmarried daughters, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Kitty and Lydia. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen had put my left out dictionary into good use. I have to admit, I was very slow in the first pages, however, nearing the end, I was like a driver going at mph, eager to reach the finish lin "I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look, or the words, which laid the foundation/5.

Pride And Prejudice by Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen, is a remarkable novel depicting the complications between a man and a woman before and as they fall in love.

Elizabeth Bennet, the protagonist, is a twenty-year old lady who is an active member in the simple country society . Pride and Prejudice Chapter XIX Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice Volume II: Chapter XIII.

If Elizabeth, when Mr. Darcy gave her the letter, did not expect it to contain a renewal of his offers, she had formed no expectation at all of its contents.

It portrays life in the genteel rural society of the day, List of important places in Pride and Prejudice, and in Jane Austen's life, with map of England.

Mrs. Bennet's delighted Pride in the marriage of "her two most deserving daughters". Notes About this document.

Pride And Prejudice by Jane Austen